Potsdam Conference – Day 16: Wednesday, August 1, 1945

Wednesday, August 1, 1945 at Potsdam, Germany

By this point, all efforts had been put into place to wrap things up by August 2nd. As a matter of fact, the final two plenary sessions would take place today, with the thirteenth and final session adjourning just after midnight.

President Truman called the twelfth plenary session to order at 3:30 PM. After the Big Three agreed that Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia could claim German assets within their jurisdiction – which would be published in the protocol as well as the impending communiqué – the next subject was Nazi war criminals and whether or not prominent prisoners should be referred to by names.

“Names are necessary and are very important to give proper orientation,” Stalin said. “The people should know that we are going to try some industrialists, that is why we mentioned Krupp.”

Truman didn’t like this idea. “If you name some, others will think they have escaped,” the President pointed out.

“Well, people wonder about Hess living comfortably in England,” Stalin fired back.

A few of the most notorious names prosecuted: (From left to right) Herman Göring, Rudolf Hess, Joachim von Ribbentrop, and Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel (who signed the unconditional surrender for Nazi Germany on May 8, 1945) in the first row at Nuremberg.

Attlee quickly spoke up and said, “You need not worry about that.”

At any rate, the Allies had eventually agreed to prosecute leading war criminals of Nazi Germany with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson leading the prosecution. Twenty-two defendants would be charged with “crimes against peace” (planning and waging a war of aggression), war crimes, and crimes against humanity. Twelve of the twenty-two were sentenced to death, a further seven received prison sentences, and three were acquitted. Numerous other trials against further Nazi conspirators took place separately in the four zones of occupation in the immediate years to come.

Prime Minister Attlee then spoke up and said, “We have an agreement regarding the feeding and fueling of Berlin for the next 30 days. I suggest that we instruct the Control Council to provide a program to provide uniform subsistence standards for the next six months. This is a practical matter which requires immediate action.”

Before the end of WWII and even during the course of the Potsdam Conference, the Foreign Ministers had laid the groundwork for the establishment of the Allied Control Council (ACC). This body would be the chief authority in Germany, as it functioned based on the instructions from the leaders of the four occupying powers on matters involving each Allied country’s own zone of occupation and matters affecting Germany as a whole.

The Kammergericht (the supreme court of the state of Prussia) – located at Kleistpark in the Berlin-Schöneberg district – housed the ACC during it’s short active life. Notice the four white flagpoles which once held the flags of the four Allied occupying powers.

Furthermore, the ACC communicated with the German people via official pronouncements such as laws, orders, directives, and proclamations. It was seated in Berlin and would play a pivotal role on the governing of Germany and Berlin in the immediate years following WWII.

After a brief discussion about equitable Allied property in the satellite states as a further point to the topic of reparations, President Truman adjourned the session at 5:50 PM.

The delegations would now have just under five hours to finalize all the agreements in the protocol and to cram in any extra details or content before the Big Three took their seats in the Cecilienhof Palace for the last time.