Potsdam Conference – Day 14: Monday, July 30, 1945

Monday, July 30, 1945 at Potsdam, Germany

President Truman and Prime Minister Attlee received word early this morning that Stalin was still feeling ill and was directed by his doctors to remain at his villa for another day. Therefore, the eleventh plenary session would once again be suspended for today.

Potsdam Conference room at the Cecilienhof Palace in Potsdam

Instead, the Foreign Ministers and their advisors met for the tenth time at 5:00 PM in the conference room at Cecilienhof.

Ernest Bevin, the British Foreign Minister, chaired today’s meeting and suggested that the following questions be on the agenda for debate:

1. The invitation to the Governments of France and China to participate in the Council of Foreign Ministers.
2. Notification to the French Government of the decision on political principles with respect to Germany.
3. Reparations from Germany, Austria and Italy.
4. Disposition of the German fleet and merchant navy.
5. Political principles in the first stage of the control period in Germany—additional points.
6. Yugoslavia.
7. War crimes.

Most of these topics had already been addressed – and in some cases heavily debated – at some point during the Potsdam Conference, except for war crimes.

Soviet Foreign Minister Vyacheslav Molotov (1939-1949)

Molotov made a well deserved point that many people would expect the Potsdam Conference to say a word on how to deal with Nazi war crimes. The Soviet proposal was that the first ten war criminals who were currently in Allied custody should soon be dealt with.

Secretary Byrnes also agreed and said that he had already discussed the matter of German war criminals with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson, who was leading the U.S. War Crimes Commission, but wanted to talk with him again to ascertain the status of the Commission’s negotiations.

Molotov then suggested that they discuss the matter tomorrow. He had information to the effect that the disagreements in the War Crimes Commission had been disposed of with two exceptions which would be easy to settle. There had been a disagreement as to the place where the tribunal should sit—whether in Berlin or in Nuremberg. He said the Soviets would agree to either place.

British Foreign Minister Ernest Bevin (1945-1951)

Foreign Minister Bevin then said that he was glad of this because the British delegation preferred Nuremberg. As this was the city in which the NSDAP held its annual party rally, it would be befitting to bring the criminals to justice in a city that was so highly revered by the Nazis.

Meanwhile, President Truman spent most of the day at the Little White House in Babelsberg. He wrote in his diary that he ordered the USS Augusta to make its way to Portsmouth, England where he would take an airplane and meet it after the conference was over.

He desperately wanted to go home and knew that leaving from England would get him their quicker than if he had left from Antwerp, as initially planned.

The Truman Villa (“Little White House”) on Griebnitzsee in Potsdam-Babelsberg

Furthermore, he expressed his frustrations on paper about the stalemate over the discussion of Poland’s borders and reparations. He also seemed to be annoyed by the fact that the conference was once again delayed due to Stalin’s indisposition.

Yet, it’d only be a matter of a few more days and the Potsdam Conference would finally be over.